Spaghetti squash has a fraction of the calories and carbohydrates as regular pasta, and it's super easy to prepare. Simply cut the spaghetti squash in half lengthwise, remove the seeds, microwave 7 to 8 minutes on each side (face up, then face down), and then run a fork down the length of the squash. It will come out like spaghetti noodles. Add sauce or pesto and you'll never know the difference! (Also try these other healthy pasta alternatives.)
As it turns out, healthy habits make a big difference. According to this analysis, people who met criteria for all five habits enjoyed significantly, impressively longer lives than those who had none: 14 years for women and 12 years for men (if they had these habits at age 50). People who had none of these habits were far more likely to die prematurely from cancer or cardiovascular disease.

Look for oat milk from Oatly, walnut and hazelnut milks from Elmhurst 1925, pecan milk from MALK, flax milk from Manitoba Milling Co., and banana milk from Mooala. Wondering why your alternative milk’s label says “milked nuts” or “malk”? It’s because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the process of likely banning all nondairy milks from using “milk” in their names.
At one of your meals today, double the amount of vegetables on your plate and skip the starch. A simple way to do it: Serve stir-fry over a bed of broccoli instead of rice. (Or turn the broccoli into rice!) The florets of the broccoli will soak up the sauce and juices from your dish just like the rice would have. Plus, you have the added cancer-fighting addition of indole 3-carbinol, a potent anti-cancer nutrient found in vegetables like broccoli and cabbage. (Also try making vegetable steaks instead of meat.)
Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
One of the more difficult situations to handle is the morning tea treat that may well present itself in an office environment courtesy of someone’s birthday, a reward or thank you to your team or a team meeting that requires a snack. These snacks usually include cakes and savories filled with sugar or carbohydrates. Do you have a plan for avoiding these? Do you like to keep quiet about your healthy food choices, or do you prefer to let your team know about the lifestyle changes you’re making? An alternative morning tea snack is a handful of almonds or a piece of fruit.
Pistachios have two main advantages over any other nuts. First, you get to eat more pistachios per ounce than any other nut. One ounce of pistachios is about 40 nuts, while one ounce of almonds is only about 22 nuts. Second, it takes a lot longer to eat one ounce of pistachios, thanks to their shells. This longer snacking time means you'll eat more slowly and feel full for a longer time.
Since launching in 2013, Soom’s sales have exploded by 1,300 percent. Tahini is rich in minerals like magnesium and potassium and it's high in protein and unsaturated fat. For cooks, tahini offers a wonderfully creamy texture and can be used to enhance a variety of foods. Expect to see tahini showing up in everything from salad dressing to vegan caramel sauce in the year ahead.

Quaker, the brand that’s practically synonymous with oats stateside, just released its own version of oat milk, too. It's called Oat Beverage and it will be hitting the refrigerated section of grocery stores nationwide in January. While oat milk is relatively low in calories, compared to other non-dairy beverages it has a high carbohydrate content so it's not suitable for those looking to cut carbs.

Quick and easy gluten-free dinner recipes also happen to be incredibly delicious. Try one of these mouthwatering gluten-free recipes for dinner, or make ahead for lunches during your busy week. Each recipe relies on protein, vegetables, and grains that all are gluten-free, but even if you don't have a gluten sensitivity or diagnosed issue, this recipe collection is a great source for tasty, comforting recipes you can make for the whole family. Be sure to read labels carefully; sometimes gluten hides in unexpected places.
Set a regular sleep schedule. When Shives treats insomnia patients, she tells them that although they can't make themselves fall asleep, they can make themselves get up at a certain time the next morning. And though they may be tired at first, if they don't nap, they may start sleeping better during the following nights. "We're going to get nowhere if they take big naps during the day and keep a very erratic sleep schedule; it's chaos then," Shives says.

Mountains of research studies show that the more fruits and veggies you eat, the lower your risk of heart disease. A 2014 meta-analysis of studies following nearly 470,000 people found that each additional daily serving of fruits and vegetables cut the risk of death by heart disease by an average of 4 percent. The superstars that contributed the most benefits? Leafy green vegetables. Low in calories but high in fiber, leafy greens like spinach, lettuce, kale and cabbage deliver vitamins and minerals essential for heart health. They're especially high in vitamin K, important for proper blood clotting. One surprising recent study in teens suggests that a lack of vitamin K may affect the actual heart structure, leading to a higher risk of heart disease later in life.
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