Get enough sleep daily; the CDC recommends the following by age group (naps inclusive); 12-18 hours from birth to 2 months, 14-15 hours from 3-11 months of age, 12-18 hours for 1-3 years of age, 11-13 hours for 3-5 years of age, 10-11 hours for 5-10 years of age, eight and a half to nine and a half hours for 10-17 years of age and those 18 and above need seven to nine hours of sleep. Elderly people need about seven to nine hours but do not sleep as deeply and may awaken at night or wake early, so naps (like kids need) allow them to accumulate the total of seven to nine hours of sleep.

Mountains of research studies show that the more fruits and veggies you eat, the lower your risk of heart disease. A 2014 meta-analysis of studies following nearly 470,000 people found that each additional daily serving of fruits and vegetables cut the risk of death by heart disease by an average of 4 percent. The superstars that contributed the most benefits? Leafy green vegetables. Low in calories but high in fiber, leafy greens like spinach, lettuce, kale and cabbage deliver vitamins and minerals essential for heart health. They're especially high in vitamin K, important for proper blood clotting. One surprising recent study in teens suggests that a lack of vitamin K may affect the actual heart structure, leading to a higher risk of heart disease later in life.

Tahini, a paste made from ground sesame seeds, has taken off as a rich addition to cookies and brownies. Though centuries old, the confluence of consumer interest in plant-based ingredients, dairy- and gluten-free products, and the paleo diet have all created a special place for tahini to thrive. And new players in the space, like Philadelphia-based Soom Foods, have modernized how we think of this Mediterranean ingredient.
I agree with David (9th July comment) with regard to diet. Whole grains can indeed have the effect of spiking blood sugar (whole grain bread as just one example) and creating gut inflammation, and therefore low-grade, sub-acute inflammation in general. This is the biggest contributor to chronic disease that we are facing, long-term inflammation. The standard food pyramid is, in my opinion, all wrong. I believe we should eat a more Mediterranean diet, and minimise the grain-based carbohydrates, and the sugars. Then we are considerably further down the track towards a healthy diet that promotes longevity. Of course, all of the other factors mentioned are important as well, but what we put into our mouths is probably the most important, given the skyrocketing rates of obesity first world countries are facing, and now even asian countries as well, who are well and truly catching up.

Tobacco use causes or contributes to a large number of cancers in the U.S. In men, 90% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking; 80% in women. Tobacco use causes cancers of the lung, mouth, lip, tongue, esophagus,kidney, and bladder. It also further increases the risk of bladder cancer in subjects occupationally exposed to certain organic chemicals found in the textile, leather, rubber, dye, paint, and other organic chemical industries, and further increases the risk of lung cancer among subjects exposed to asbestos.

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
As it turns out, healthy habits make a big difference. According to this analysis, people who met criteria for all five habits enjoyed significantly, impressively longer lives than those who had none: 14 years for women and 12 years for men (if they had these habits at age 50). People who had none of these habits were far more likely to die prematurely from cancer or cardiovascular disease.

Observational studies have shown that people who engage in mentally stimulating activities may be less likely to develop dementia. But Knopman notes that such studies don't prove cause and effect, so it's not clear if mentally stimulating activities protect against dementia or whether people with healthier brains are drawn to those activities in the first place.

The most important aspect here is the mentality you bring to your exercise. Ideally, it’s not a chore but an enjoyable occasion. If that means you invite a friend to make it a social occasion too, then by all means do whatever it takes to get you outside, inhaling fresh air and experiencing the endorphins that our body releases when we are active. The feeling of satisfaction after completing a work out of some variety is hard to beat. It’s also addictive.


Of course, you don't have to stick to just pinto beans! Go for a wide variety: black beans, kidney beans, cannellini beans, cranberry beans and fava beans, plus other legumes like chickpeas, black-eyed peas, lentils and more. They're chock-full of fiber, magnesium and potassium—all nutrients that help lower blood pressure and keep your heart going strong.
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