Cut down on oily and sugary food, soda and caffeine. If possible, reduce your intake of fast food, French fries, doughnuts, chips, wedges, and deep-fried food. Not only are they very fattening (1 tablespoon of oil is 120 calories), deep fried food contains acrylamide, a potential cancer-causing chemical. There are better alternatives, such as grilled, steamed, stir-fried, or even raw food.
“I think we’re finally moving away from [only] calories and numbers,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, who is in private practice in New York City and Los Angeles. “My clients want to know more about the functional benefits of foods, including how they impact digestive health, immunity, sleep, energy, and mental focus. More consumers are now connecting food choices with everyday quality-of-life outcomes, and labels that offer more information can help make that easier.”
The ketogenic diet has garnered a ton of followers in 2018, giving rise to products that cater to its adherents. Since people following the keto diet must stick to eating mostly fats (60-80 percent of their total caloric intake), dieters often need to add oil to their meals to stay within the right macro numbers. Medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil from coconuts is one easy way to add more fat. It now comes in a powdered form that makes it easier to dissolve in coffee or even a glass of water. Plus, it adds 6 grams of fat per scoop.
While we’re all different when it comes to the amount of sleep we require to be at our best during the day, seven to nine hours a night is an accepted norm. Understand how much you need and do your best to protect this requirement by organizing your commitments accordingly. Begin your bedtime routine an hour before the time you actually need to be sleeping. If that’s turning all the lights off, brushing your teeth, getting into your pyjamas and reading a book, then give yourself the time to wind down before your head actually hits the pillow.

Studies show the ruby-red fruit may help reduce the buildup of plaque in arteries and lower blood pressure. Experts believe that pomegranate's benefits come from its powerful punch of polyphenols, including anthocyanins (found in blue, purple and deep-red foods) and tannins (also found in wine and tea). In a 2010 study ranking the antioxidant capacity of 3,100 foods from all over the world, pomegranate juice had the highest antioxidants of any fruit juice.
Sipping an afternoon cup of green tea may be an easy way to help your heart. That's because green tea has catechins, powerful antioxidants that, over time, can significantly reduce levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Drinking a lot of green tea could even add years to your life. An 11-year study that followed 40,530 Japanese adults found that those who drank five cups of green tea a day had a 26 percent lower risk of heart disease and a 16 percent lower risk of death from all causes, compared to those who drank less than one cup a day.
It's no secret that whole grains are a healthier choice than their overly processed, refined-grain cousins. A recent analysis of 45 studies found that eating at least three servings a day of whole grains was linked with a 22 percent lower risk of heart disease. That's because whole grains are rich in antioxidants, phytoestrogens and phytosterols—all nutrients that protect against heart disease.
×