Be wary of the lattes at your local coffee shop, as they're often loaded with extra sugar and empty calories. Pure coffee beans contain powerful health-boosting antioxidants. Don't erase these benefits with a waistline expanding helping of whole milk and added sugar. Opt for regular coffee and add a splash of your own cream and zero-calorie sweetener—or try to drink it black.
Skip smoothies sold at your local smoothie bar or fast-food joint, as they're usually packed with tons of sugar. Instead, toss these ingredients in the blender for a healthy meal on the go: 1 scoop of your favorite protein powder; 1 small handful of walnuts; 1 cup of spinach or kale; 1 to 1 1/2 cups of blueberries, strawberries, peaches, or bananas; a couple ice cubes; and 2 cups of water. Blend until the ice is completely crushed. (We also have way more healthy smoothie recipes that are perfect for breakfast.)

Tobacco use causes atherosclerotic arterial disease (hardening and narrowing of the arteries) that can lead to heart attacks, strokes, and lack of blood flow to the lower extremities. Tobacco use causes an estimated 20%-30% of coronary heart disease in the U.S. It also further increases the risk of heart attacks among subjects with elevated cholesterol, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle.
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We all know whole grains are good for us, but we’ve collected the best whole-grain recipes to make them a regular part of your cooking routine. The fiber and nutrients associated with whole grains make them an essential part of a healthy diet, but it’s often difficult to work them into your everyday cooking. This collection of recipes uses whole grains—from brown rice to whole-wheat pasta—in a delicious variety of ways.

Conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, joint disease, and mental illness are responsible for a vast number of deaths and disabilities. Currently, we rely almost exclusively on the provision of clinical care by highly trained health professionals as our major strategy to deal with these conditions. Many health problems can be prevented or at least their occurrence postponed by having a healthy lifestyle.
Why is there such a sudden frenzy over the purple berry? YouTube is rich with DIY videos for making a cold and flu-fighting elderberry syrup. But LaMonte cautions that you really need to know what you’re doing before you make elderberries part of your diet since raw elderberries, as well as the leaves and flowers, contain a chemical that produces cyanide, which can cause nausea, vomiting and even more serious issues at high doses. If you're just getting acquainted with the fruit, it's best to start with a store-bought version of the syrup — just look for one that doesn't contain too many additives and excess sugar.
The second part of a healthy active lifestyle is exercise. A regular exercise routine, such as working out at a gym, going for a daily walk or jog, or doing some regular weight lifting is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle. There are other ways to incorporate exercise into everyday life; for instance, take the stairs instead of the elevator, park further away from the door when driving somewhere, and take a break from work to go for a walk.
Get enough sleep daily; the CDC recommends the following by age group (naps inclusive); 12-18 hours from birth to 2 months, 14-15 hours from 3-11 months of age, 12-18 hours for 1-3 years of age, 11-13 hours for 3-5 years of age, 10-11 hours for 5-10 years of age, eight and a half to nine and a half hours for 10-17 years of age and those 18 and above need seven to nine hours of sleep. Elderly people need about seven to nine hours but do not sleep as deeply and may awaken at night or wake early, so naps (like kids need) allow them to accumulate the total of seven to nine hours of sleep.
Tahini, a paste made from ground sesame seeds, has taken off as a rich addition to cookies and brownies. Though centuries old, the confluence of consumer interest in plant-based ingredients, dairy- and gluten-free products, and the paleo diet have all created a special place for tahini to thrive. And new players in the space, like Philadelphia-based Soom Foods, have modernized how we think of this Mediterranean ingredient.
Plant-based eating is a trend that won't go away anytime soon. A flexitarian eating style, allowing anyone and everyone to add more produce and other plant nutrients to their day, appears to be a main driver. “Options that allow people to go more plant-based without becoming totally vegan or vegetarian is a trend that is gaining more momentum,” says Patricia Bannan, RDN, who is in private practice in Los Angeles. “For example, the mushroom-and-meat blended burger has really taken off, and continues to grow across the board at the restaurant, retail, and consumer levels. This burger has an improved nutritional profile and even more of the brothy, rich, meaty umami flavor compared with a traditional burger.”
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Go for brown carbs vs. white carbs. White carbsare refined grains like white rice, pasta, white bread, crackers, noodles, tortillas, wraps, anything with white flour and breading. The nutrients have been removed in the production process, leaving them rich in calories but low in nutrients. They also cause unhealthy spikes in our sugar levels. Go for brown carbs (unrefined complex carbs) instead, like brown rice, whole grain, oats, oatmeal (not the instant kind), and legumes. These come with nutrients and vitamins intact.

Vegetables and legumes – raw or cooked vegetables can be used as a snack food or as a part of lunch and dinner. Salad vegetables can be used as a sandwich filling. Vegetable soup can make a healthy lunch. Stir-fries, vegetable patties and vegetable curries make nutritious evening meals. Try raw vegetables like carrot and celery sticks for a snack ‘on the run’.

“Clearly, the greatest cancer risks are concentrated in the heavy and moderate drinker categories. Nevertheless, some cancer risk persists even at low levels of consumption. A meta-analysis that focused solely on cancer risks associated with drinking one drink or fewer per day observed that this level of alcohol consumption was still associated with some elevated risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, oropharyngeal cancer, and breast cancer, but no discernable associations were seen for cancers of the colorectum, larynx, and liver. On the basis of the lesser overall cancer risk at the lower end of the dose-response continuum, the World Cancer Research Fund/AICR made the following recommendation: ‘If alcoholic drinks are consumed, limit consumption to two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women.'” You can check out the entire article here: http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1155
Chocolate has gotten a lot of buzz in recent years as a heart-healthy treat. Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, plant nutrients that help repair cell damage. Flavanols—cocoa's main kind of flavonoid—help lower blood pressure, promote proper blood clotting and boost blood flow to the brain and heart. Add to that a hefty helping of minerals, fiber and other powerful antioxidants, and you have one sweet package. And the heart benefits are impressive: In one study of nearly 5,000 people, nibbling on chocolate five or more times a week was associated with a whopping 57 percent lower risk of heart disease, compared to non-chocolate eaters. (Keep in mind, though, that this was an observational study, so the research didn't prove a cause and effect.)
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