The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
Of course, you don't have to stick to just pinto beans! Go for a wide variety: black beans, kidney beans, cannellini beans, cranberry beans and fava beans, plus other legumes like chickpeas, black-eyed peas, lentils and more. They're chock-full of fiber, magnesium and potassium—all nutrients that help lower blood pressure and keep your heart going strong.
Eating two or more servings of fish a week is linked with a 30 percent lower risk of developing coronary heart disease, studies show. Fish—especially oily kinds like salmon and tuna—are rich in omega-3 fats, which reduce levels of triglycerides that can cause heart problems. Omega-3s also help lower blood pressure and can help prevent irregular heart rhythms. Which fish is best? No common fish delivers more of the omega-3 fatty acids than salmon. Go for wild-caught Alaskan salmon if you can. Compared to most farmed salmon, it's generally lower in calories and pollutants and higher in omega-3s—and is better for the planet.
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Study investigators also calculated life expectancy by how many of these five healthy habits people had. Just one healthy habit (and it didn’t matter which one) … just one… extended life expectancy by two years in men and women. Not surprisingly, the more healthy habits people had, the longer their lifespan. This is one of those situations where I wish I could reprint their graphs for you, because they’re so cool. (But if you’re very curious, the article is available online, and the graphs are on page 7. Check out Graph B, “Estimated life expectancy at age 50 according to the number of low-risk factors.”)
Look for people like you. The details of their lives don't have to match yours, but look for a similar level of openness. "What really is important in terms of promoting relationship well-being is that you share a similar level of comfort in getting close to people," DeWall says. For instance, he says that someone who needs a lot of reassurance might not find the best relationship with someone who's more standoffish. "Feel people out in terms of, 'Does this person seem like me in terms of wanting to be close to other people?'" DeWall suggests.
When performing your energy system training (cardio training), always try to push the intensity of your work intervals. If using a rate of perceived exertion scale to monitor intensity, your work intervals should fall between 7 and 8.5 (i.e., very hard to very, very hard) during your session. Perform as many of your work intervals at the higher end of the RPE range for fastest and best results. (Also try HIIT training, which comes with tons of benefits.)
And, in the evening, after your dinner when your sweet tooth is crying out for ice cream or cake. What then? Busy yourself with an activity. Whether it be reading a book, television, Netflix, life admin or washing, your improved nutrition plan should ensure you have enough nutrients for the day, so these cravings are nothing more than your brain playing tricks on you. Oh yeah, and drink plenty of water!
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Quaker, the brand that’s practically synonymous with oats stateside, just released its own version of oat milk, too. It's called Oat Beverage and it will be hitting the refrigerated section of grocery stores nationwide in January. While oat milk is relatively low in calories, compared to other non-dairy beverages it has a high carbohydrate content so it's not suitable for those looking to cut carbs.
Protein is all the rage, and here’s why: It helps keep you fuller for longer, helping to fight the urge to snack all day long and also providing fuel for your workouts. You’ll find YQ by Yoplait plain yogurt made with ultra-filtered milk, offering 17 grams of protein per 5.3-ounce single-serve container; collagen-based coffee creamer from Vital Proteins; and ready-to-drink soups with collagen protein from Zupa Noma.
It doesn't matter how many hours you spend at the gym each week: if you don't clean up your diet, you will not see the results you want! A study from the University of Texas found that without dietary control, people who completed a 12-week program of resistance training and high-intensity interval training lost a disappointing 1 percent of body fat. Don't let your hard work go to waste! (That's exactly why Harley Pasternak says working out is the least important part of losing weight.)
When performing your energy system training (cardio training), always try to push the intensity of your work intervals. If using a rate of perceived exertion scale to monitor intensity, your work intervals should fall between 7 and 8.5 (i.e., very hard to very, very hard) during your session. Perform as many of your work intervals at the higher end of the RPE range for fastest and best results. (Also try HIIT training, which comes with tons of benefits.)
Whizzed up in a smoothie or mashed and spread on toast, avocados are a yummy way to boost your heart health. They're loaded with heart-healthy monounsaturated fats—including oleic acid, the same fat that gives olive oil some of its many perks. But that's not all. Avocados are a rich source of potassium—an essential mineral many people don't get enough of that helps lower blood pressure and the risk of stroke. They're high in vitamins and heart-friendly fiber too. Need more convincing? A 2017 review found that eating avocados may help fight metabolic syndrome, a dangerous cluster of conditions that often leads to heart disease.
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