Eating two or more servings of fish a week is linked with a 30 percent lower risk of developing coronary heart disease, studies show. Fish—especially oily kinds like salmon and tuna—are rich in omega-3 fats, which reduce levels of triglycerides that can cause heart problems. Omega-3s also help lower blood pressure and can help prevent irregular heart rhythms. Which fish is best? No common fish delivers more of the omega-3 fatty acids than salmon. Go for wild-caught Alaskan salmon if you can. Compared to most farmed salmon, it's generally lower in calories and pollutants and higher in omega-3s—and is better for the planet.
Set a regular sleep schedule. When Shives treats insomnia patients, she tells them that although they can't make themselves fall asleep, they can make themselves get up at a certain time the next morning. And though they may be tired at first, if they don't nap, they may start sleeping better during the following nights. "We're going to get nowhere if they take big naps during the day and keep a very erratic sleep schedule; it's chaos then," Shives says.
Whizzed up in a smoothie or mashed and spread on toast, avocados are a yummy way to boost your heart health. They're loaded with heart-healthy monounsaturated fats—including oleic acid, the same fat that gives olive oil some of its many perks. But that's not all. Avocados are a rich source of potassium—an essential mineral many people don't get enough of that helps lower blood pressure and the risk of stroke. They're high in vitamins and heart-friendly fiber too. Need more convincing? A 2017 review found that eating avocados may help fight metabolic syndrome, a dangerous cluster of conditions that often leads to heart disease.
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