Add a healthy kick to scrambled eggs by including salsa. Not only will it boost the flavor of your morning meal, but tomatoes are packed with lycopene, a nutrient that's been found to reduce cancer risk. Your body can absorb more lycopene from cooked or processed tomato products like salsa. (Try these other vegetable-filled breakfast ideas that don't include omelets.)
Do you habitually eat lunch at your desk or in front of the TV? A 2011 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who multitask while eating lunch (study participants played solitaire) felt less full and ate more food 30 minutes later than those who were not distracted during lunch. Next time you sit down to eat, do just that—and nothing else. Taking 10 minutes to focus on and enjoy the food you're eating will leave you more satisfied and more in control of your appetite. (It's called mindful eating, and here's how you do it.)
Exercise – Try to exercise at least 30 minutes a day, three times a week – it can even be split up into 10 minute walks. The effects of brief physical exertion last much longer than those of caffeine, and exercise decreases stress rather than increasing it! Finding a physical activity that you really like to do will make exercise more fun and something to look forward to as well as help to keep you healthy throughout life. So try something new or something that has always appealed to you.

Skip smoothies sold at your local smoothie bar or fast-food joint, as they're usually packed with tons of sugar. Instead, toss these ingredients in the blender for a healthy meal on the go: 1 scoop of your favorite protein powder; 1 small handful of walnuts; 1 cup of spinach or kale; 1 to 1 1/2 cups of blueberries, strawberries, peaches, or bananas; a couple ice cubes; and 2 cups of water. Blend until the ice is completely crushed. (We also have way more healthy smoothie recipes that are perfect for breakfast.)
Triglycerides are found in body fat and from the fats you eat. Triglycerides levels in the blood reflect what you have eaten recently. HDL and LDL cholesterol levels show what you have been eating over a long period of time. If you eat a fatty meal your triglyceride levels will be elevated for a short period of time. If you continue to eat a diet high in fat your triglyceride levels will continue to rise. The liver transfers the triglycerides into body fat, or cholesterol, which raises LDL and lowers HDL levels in the blood.
Whizzed up in a smoothie or mashed and spread on toast, avocados are a yummy way to boost your heart health. They're loaded with heart-healthy monounsaturated fats—including oleic acid, the same fat that gives olive oil some of its many perks. But that's not all. Avocados are a rich source of potassium—an essential mineral many people don't get enough of that helps lower blood pressure and the risk of stroke. They're high in vitamins and heart-friendly fiber too. Need more convincing? A 2017 review found that eating avocados may help fight metabolic syndrome, a dangerous cluster of conditions that often leads to heart disease.
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