Why is there such a sudden frenzy over the purple berry? YouTube is rich with DIY videos for making a cold and flu-fighting elderberry syrup. But LaMonte cautions that you really need to know what you’re doing before you make elderberries part of your diet since raw elderberries, as well as the leaves and flowers, contain a chemical that produces cyanide, which can cause nausea, vomiting and even more serious issues at high doses. If you're just getting acquainted with the fruit, it's best to start with a store-bought version of the syrup — just look for one that doesn't contain too many additives and excess sugar.

Physical activity is important for people of all weight ranges and health conditions. It helps us burn off the extra calories, it is good for the heart and circulatory system, it maintains or increases our muscle mass, it helps us focus, and improves overall health well-being. We don't have to be top athletes to get on the move! 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity is advised, and it can easily become part of our daily routine. We all could:

Drink more water. Most of us don’t drink enough water every day. Water is essential for our body to function. Did you know that over 60% of our body is made up of water? Water is needed to carry out body functions, remove waste, and carry nutrients and oxygen around our body. Since we lose water every day through urine, bowel movements, perspiration and breathing, we need to replenish our water intake. Since food intake contributes about 20% of our fluid intake, that means we need to drink about 8-10 glasses a day to stay hydrated.
Chocolate has gotten a lot of buzz in recent years as a heart-healthy treat. Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, plant nutrients that help repair cell damage. Flavanols—cocoa's main kind of flavonoid—help lower blood pressure, promote proper blood clotting and boost blood flow to the brain and heart. Add to that a hefty helping of minerals, fiber and other powerful antioxidants, and you have one sweet package. And the heart benefits are impressive: In one study of nearly 5,000 people, nibbling on chocolate five or more times a week was associated with a whopping 57 percent lower risk of heart disease, compared to non-chocolate eaters. (Keep in mind, though, that this was an observational study, so the research didn't prove a cause and effect.)
Many people are either interested in specific eating styles or increasingly aware of their own dietary sensitivities. That’s why you’ll find many convenience foods tailored to low-FODMAP eating patterns — meaning these foods avoid ingredients that tend to trigger IBS symptoms, such as onion, garlic, and even gluten. Fody offers low-FODMAP salsa, ketchup, salad dressings, and more, while Rachel Pauls sells low-FODMAP bars, jerky, and spices. Even Prego offers a Sensitive Recipe pasta sauce sans onions and garlic.
Trying to decide what you're going to eat in the morning while you're rushing to get out the door is a recipe for diet disaster. Take 10 minutes tonight to plan out all your breakfasts for the week. Having a weekly nutrition plan will increase your likelihood of following through and eating breakfast every morning. (The 30-Day Meal Prep Challenge covers all the basics.)
People of all ages can incorporate regular exercise into their lives to develop a healthy active lifestyle. Many people who lead active lifestyles also enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, kayaking, or skiing, which can be great ways to have fun, make new friends, and get in better physical shape. Leading a healthy lifestyle is a great way to lose weight and maintain that weight loss over time, rather than a fad diet where the weight may come back just as quickly as it came off.
Being Healthy is so important. Just change one thing in your life today. Have a healthy life beginning now. Living a healthy lifestyle will bring you happiness, health and the life of your dreams. You can fit into your favourite pair of jeans again. You can enjoy all the benefits that perfect health offers you. You can feel your best at all times of the day.
Great article and insight. Education is key when it comes to a healthy lifestyle. I am curious as to why stress management was not looked at? Numerous research studies have shown stress to be a factor in heart disease, reducing life expectancy. Also, hydration is important and often overlooked. So many factors are involved when it comes to our health.

Many people are either interested in specific eating styles or increasingly aware of their own dietary sensitivities. That’s why you’ll find many convenience foods tailored to low-FODMAP eating patterns — meaning these foods avoid ingredients that tend to trigger IBS symptoms, such as onion, garlic, and even gluten. Fody offers low-FODMAP salsa, ketchup, salad dressings, and more, while Rachel Pauls sells low-FODMAP bars, jerky, and spices. Even Prego offers a Sensitive Recipe pasta sauce sans onions and garlic.

Non-dairy milks (or mylks), like almond and coconut, have been big over the past five years, but oat milk is set to outpace them by 2019. It’s allergen free (unless you're allergic to oats) and baristas love it because it foams up nicely for lattes. Oatly, a brand from Sweden, has increased production of its oat milk by 1,250 percent since 2017 after it was first introduced to cafes in the U.S.
Studies show the ruby-red fruit may help reduce the buildup of plaque in arteries and lower blood pressure. Experts believe that pomegranate's benefits come from its powerful punch of polyphenols, including anthocyanins (found in blue, purple and deep-red foods) and tannins (also found in wine and tea). In a 2010 study ranking the antioxidant capacity of 3,100 foods from all over the world, pomegranate juice had the highest antioxidants of any fruit juice.
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Mountains of research studies show that the more fruits and veggies you eat, the lower your risk of heart disease. A 2014 meta-analysis of studies following nearly 470,000 people found that each additional daily serving of fruits and vegetables cut the risk of death by heart disease by an average of 4 percent. The superstars that contributed the most benefits? Leafy green vegetables. Low in calories but high in fiber, leafy greens like spinach, lettuce, kale and cabbage deliver vitamins and minerals essential for heart health. They're especially high in vitamin K, important for proper blood clotting. One surprising recent study in teens suggests that a lack of vitamin K may affect the actual heart structure, leading to a higher risk of heart disease later in life.
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