“People recognize that whole grains are much more nutritious than refined grains, so they’re prioritizing these when shopping for packaged products,” says Cassetty. “One brand I love is Quinn Snacks. Since they’re made with whole grains, I feel good about giving them to my son and recommending them to clients looking for a healthier snack, in moderation. I also like their microwave popcorn because unlike other brands, the toppings are added after it’s popped.”
Tahini, a paste made from ground sesame seeds, has taken off as a rich addition to cookies and brownies. Though centuries old, the confluence of consumer interest in plant-based ingredients, dairy- and gluten-free products, and the paleo diet have all created a special place for tahini to thrive. And new players in the space, like Philadelphia-based Soom Foods, have modernized how we think of this Mediterranean ingredient.
It's been a diet staple in Mediterranean countries—where people tend to live longer—for thousands of years. And for good reason: olive oil is not only excellent for cooking, but it also delivers powerful heart-healthy benefits. Stacks of studies confirm that extra-virgin olive oil in particular helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol and prevents blood clots. It also fights inflammation: researchers have found that oleocanthal, a compound in virgin olive oil, has anti-inflammatory properties similar to ibuprofen. Rich in monounsaturated fats and antioxidants, olive oil has another plus: studies show it can help you stick to a healthy weight, which can further slash your risk of heart disease. The bottom line: If olive oil isn't a staple in your pantry yet, it should be.
Non-dairy milks (or mylks), like almond and coconut, have been big over the past five years, but oat milk is set to outpace them by 2019. It’s allergen free (unless you're allergic to oats) and baristas love it because it foams up nicely for lattes. Oatly, a brand from Sweden, has increased production of its oat milk by 1,250 percent since 2017 after it was first introduced to cafes in the U.S.
Then there are other elements to add to the list. A healthy person also knows how to manage stress, gets good quality sleep each night, doesn't drink too much, doesn't sit too much—basically, does everything in moderation all the time. When you look at everything that could possibly go into a healthy lifestyle, you can see just how hard all of those things are in our current world.
This article is designed to give tips to readers about how they can improve or augment actions in their life to have a healthy lifestyle; it is not meant to be all inclusive but will include major components that are considered to be parts of a lifestyle that lead to good health. In addition to the tips about what people should do for healthy living, the article will mention some of the tips about avoiding actions (the don'ts) that lead to unhealthy living.
Repeated dieting can actually lower metabolism and thus make your body retain more of what you put into it. Increasing exercise while not giving your body more food to compensate can also increase body fat storage. Dieting also increases heart disease risk, when compared to simply gaining a little weight. If you really need to lose weight, the most effective way is to increase exercise and cutting only a little food, while concentrating on fruits, veggies, and high fiber foods.
Confidence increases: as above, as you take on more and more challenges, you realise that the comfort zone you had once placed yourself in is now far too small for you. Watching yourself grow can be an invigorating experience, as can the feedback you receive from others regarding your progress. Let the positive energy spur you on to bigger and better things.
Your choices rub off on others: I took immense satisfaction when I received a Snapchat from a teammate of mine a couple of weeks ago. He wasn’t showing me how drunk he was at 2am; instead he was dipping some celery into a tub of hummus while on the couch at home. He was the last person I was expecting to see this from, but I guess that’s the power a healthy lifestyle can have on those impressionable people around you.
“We are learning more and more about the benefits of a healthy microbiome, so there’s a lot of interest about ways to feed the trillions of bacteria in our guts,” says Samantha Cassetty, RD, in private practice in New York City. The microbiome is the community of bacteria in the gut that may play a role in the development of health conditions such as diabetes, eczema, cancer, and depression, according to the Genetic Science Learning Center at the University of Utah.

Excellent article. But i think we can also add Yoga in the top priorities. Yoga is considered as one of the best thing that can reverse the aging effects significantly at home. There are several poses that can boost the blood circulation and provide the essential nutrition to various cells. I have found an article entitled ” 21 Yoga Poses for Anti Aging – Yoga Turns the Clock Back”
“People recognize that whole grains are much more nutritious than refined grains, so they’re prioritizing these when shopping for packaged products,” says Cassetty. “One brand I love is Quinn Snacks. Since they’re made with whole grains, I feel good about giving them to my son and recommending them to clients looking for a healthier snack, in moderation. I also like their microwave popcorn because unlike other brands, the toppings are added after it’s popped.”

As marijuana use becomes legal in more states, one of its byproducts is taking off in restaurant and cafe kitchens nationwide. Cannabidiol (CBD) comes from cannabis, but it doesn’t contain any psychoactive properties so it doesn't make you high like pot. Proponents claim that it simply mellows you out, may be helpful in reducing anxiety and even contains some anti-inflammatory properties but the full medicinal benefits of CBD have not been consistently proven in scientific studies.

Cut down on processed food. Processed foods are not good because (1) most nutritional value is lost in the making of these foods and (2) the added preservatives are bad for our health. Many processed foods contain a high amount of salt content, which leads to higher blood pressure and heart disease. Processed foods are anything that is not in its raw form. In general, most food in supermarkets are processed — the more ingredients it has on the label (especially the ones ending with ‘ite’ or ‘ate’), the more processed they are. Watch out for those with salt/sugar in the first 5 ingredients and go for unprocessed food as much as possible.
It's no secret that whole grains are a healthier choice than their overly processed, refined-grain cousins. A recent analysis of 45 studies found that eating at least three servings a day of whole grains was linked with a 22 percent lower risk of heart disease. That's because whole grains are rich in antioxidants, phytoestrogens and phytosterols—all nutrients that protect against heart disease.
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