Choosing whole foods and cooking from scratch is a much healthier way to eat than buying pre-packaged or ready-meals which are high in fat and salt but very low in nutrients. To make sure you’re getting a variety of nutrients, vitamins and minerals into your body every day – a quick rule of thumb is to pick a variety of colours for your meals. Be the artist of your meals and paint a colour picture with a variety of yellow, red and green fruits and vegetables throughout the day.
Since launching in 2013, Soom’s sales have exploded by 1,300 percent. Tahini is rich in minerals like magnesium and potassium and it's high in protein and unsaturated fat. For cooks, tahini offers a wonderfully creamy texture and can be used to enhance a variety of foods. Expect to see tahini showing up in everything from salad dressing to vegan caramel sauce in the year ahead.
Despite what most people say, muscle does not weigh more than fat! One pound of muscle and one pound of fat both weigh—no surprise—one pound. The biggest difference is that a pound of muscle takes up much less space than a pound of fat. The lesson? Focus on the way your body feels and how your clothes fit rather than the number on the scale. (Here's everything you need to know about building muscle and burning fat.)
Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressive neurological disease characterized by a fixed inexpressive face, a tremor at rest, slowing of voluntary movements, a gait with short accelerating steps, peculiar posture and muscle weakness, caused by degeneration of an area of the brain called the basal ganglia, and by low production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Most patients are over 50, but at least 10 percent are under 40.
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Green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, kale, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, bok choy, asparagus and watercress) are a great start to any meal. The wider variety of colours you have on your plate, the more likely you are to ingest a wider range of nutrients. Steaming or frying these in coconut oil will ensure the produce maintains much of its nutrients. Having these in your diet five days a week should be the minimum to keep you ticking along.
Anyone who eats a vegetarian diet knows that one of the most common questions asked is “Where do you get your protein?” But this gallery of recipes is your answer. We rounded up our favorite meat-free meals that also pack a serious punch of protein. With over 20 grams of protein per serving, these dishes are anything but rabbit food. Our hearty meals will keep you full and nourished by using vegetarian protein sources like tofu, eggs, lentils, tempeh, cheese, and beans. 

Some foods do not fit into the five food groups because they are not necessary for a healthy diet. These foods are called ‘discretionary choices’ and they should only be eaten occasionally. They tend to be too high in either energy (kilojoules), saturated fat, added sugars, added salt or alcohol, and have low levels of important nutrients like fibre.


Tools to deal with temptation: the more you say no to the unhealthy options, the better you get at it. It’s almost like you’re forming a new habit in saying ‘no, thanks.’ The planning process is crucial in being able to say no. If you’re well prepared and have either eaten a nutritious meal or snack or have one with you ready to go, it’s so much easier to pass up those spur of the moment opportunities that crop up. In taking the healthy option more often, you’ll also be more aware of which shops are health-friendly and which options are the best for you to take with you out of the house in case you have been unorganized or are in a rush.
A 2018 analysis found a surprising link between yogurt and heart health in people with high blood pressure. In the study, researchers looked at data collected over 30 years from more than 55,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study, and more than 18,000 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. They found that those who ate two or more servings of yogurt a week had a roughly 20 percent lower risk of heart attack or stroke compared to those who ate less. Adding yogurt to an already healthy diet upped the benefits even more.
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