A very good read. I think you hit the nail on the head and perhaps a few people’s fingers with your comments. USA has about 5% of the world’s population yet issues about 50% of all medical prescriptions worldwide. Common sense would tell us that the more people are well the less the need for public health, medicines and health facilities. An inverse relationship exists which implies an impressive health bill an indication of sickness not wellness. Public health can only be realistically addressed by governments acting in the public’s interest. The amount of money paid to political parties by lobbyists is very tiny compared to the money paid by the health budget and tax payer. Corporations need a cultural shift and to be aware of the growing dissatisfaction by health advocates trying to protect the general public.
Take a hot Epsom salt bath for 15 to 20 minutes to help your body recover. Magnesium sulfate, its scientific name, has been shown to help muscles relax and reduce inflammation. Epsom salts are a strong vasodilator, which means they will increase blood flow to the muscles as well as the surface of the skin. Plus, the magnesium absorbed through your skin helps build strong bones, manufactures proteins, and releases energy from muscles, in addition to numerous other benefits. Take one or two baths per week and you'll notice a big difference in how you feel.
Eating beans regularly is good for your heart, and you don't need to eat a lot of them to benefit. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that having just 1/2 cup of cooked pinto beans a day may help lower cholesterol, thanks largely to their soluble fiber, plus heart-protective flavonoids—the same kind found in chocolate, berries and red wine—which can help lower your risk for heart attack and stroke.
Study investigators also calculated life expectancy by how many of these five healthy habits people had. Just one healthy habit (and it didn’t matter which one) … just one… extended life expectancy by two years in men and women. Not surprisingly, the more healthy habits people had, the longer their lifespan. This is one of those situations where I wish I could reprint their graphs for you, because they’re so cool. (But if you’re very curious, the article is available online, and the graphs are on page 7. Check out Graph B, “Estimated life expectancy at age 50 according to the number of low-risk factors.”)
Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn't have to mean drastic changes. Making small changes in how you live may seem like a slow process, and it is. You may adapt to change better when it doesn't require you to overhaul your entire life. Just pick one thing and work on that one thing every day, letting the rest of your life and habits stay the same. You may be surprised that those small changes really can make a difference.
Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
Spaghetti squash has a fraction of the calories and carbohydrates as regular pasta, and it's super easy to prepare. Simply cut the spaghetti squash in half lengthwise, remove the seeds, microwave 7 to 8 minutes on each side (face up, then face down), and then run a fork down the length of the squash. It will come out like spaghetti noodles. Add sauce or pesto and you'll never know the difference! (Also try these other healthy pasta alternatives.)
Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the U.S., claiming one out of every four lives. And while you might think it won't happen to you (you've got great genes, right?), over time, poor eating habits—those venti flavored lattes, desk-side snacks and late-night pizza runs—can lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol and inflammation, raising your risk for heart attack and stroke.
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