Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conducted a massive study of the impact of health habits on life expectancy, using data from the well-known Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). This means that they had data on a huge number of people over a very long period of time. The NHS included over 78,000 women and followed them from 1980 to 2014. The HPFS included over 40,000 men and followed them from 1986 to 2014. This is over 120,000 participants, 34 years of data for women, and 28 years of data for men.
Being the healthiest you can possibly be means eating a variety of healthy foods, being physically active and understanding the nutrients you need to protect your bones, immune system, physical and mental health.  A healthy eating plan, knowing which diets work, how active you should be for your age and what you can do to manage your weight are important too. What about getting a good night's sleep, knowing how much alcohol puts you in the risky category and the benefits of stopping smoking even after 24 hours? All these things contribute to a healthier life and we have topped it off with recipes from Jean Hailes naturopath Sandra Villella.
A very good read. I think you hit the nail on the head and perhaps a few people’s fingers with your comments. USA has about 5% of the world’s population yet issues about 50% of all medical prescriptions worldwide. Common sense would tell us that the more people are well the less the need for public health, medicines and health facilities. An inverse relationship exists which implies an impressive health bill an indication of sickness not wellness. Public health can only be realistically addressed by governments acting in the public’s interest. The amount of money paid to political parties by lobbyists is very tiny compared to the money paid by the health budget and tax payer. Corporations need a cultural shift and to be aware of the growing dissatisfaction by health advocates trying to protect the general public.
Eating two or more servings of fish a week is linked with a 30 percent lower risk of developing coronary heart disease, studies show. Fish—especially oily kinds like salmon and tuna—are rich in omega-3 fats, which reduce levels of triglycerides that can cause heart problems. Omega-3s also help lower blood pressure and can help prevent irregular heart rhythms. Which fish is best? No common fish delivers more of the omega-3 fatty acids than salmon. Go for wild-caught Alaskan salmon if you can. Compared to most farmed salmon, it's generally lower in calories and pollutants and higher in omega-3s—and is better for the planet.
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