Just for today, replace some of the carbohydrates (rice, pasta, cereal, breads) in your diet with protein (meat, beans, egg, fish, etc.) at each meal. Researchers at the University of Illinois put people on either a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet or a moderate-protein diet. At the end of four months, all study participants lost the same amount of weight, but those who ate more protein lost 22 percent more fat and gained more muscle, leaving them looking fit and trim. The high-carbohydrate group was left "skinny fat."
There are many treatments for alcoholism. But the crucial first step to recovery is for the individual to admit there is a problem and make a commitment to address the alcoholism issue. The 12-step-style self-help programs, pioneered by Alcoholics Anonymous, can be one effective treatment. Psychologists and related professionals have developed programs to help individuals better handle emotional stresses and avoid behaviors that can lead to excess drinking. Support and understanding from family members are often critical for sustained recovery. Medication can be useful for the prevention of relapses and for withdrawal symptoms following acute or prolonged intoxication.
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Yes, spend money on prevention to reduce money on treatment in the first place. And, can you legislate portion sizes? It’s no secret that restaurants in America pride themselves on huge portions of food and people scratch their heads at the insane obesity levels in America. The American thinking of bigger and more is always better is just sending people to an earlier grave and only big business seems to care more about protecting it’s right vs politicians caring about the health of a nation.
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Hi Tom, Yes, as reported: “Study investigators also calculated life expectancy by how many of these five healthy habits people had. Just one healthy habit (and it didn’t matter which one) … just one… extended life expectancy by two years in men and women. Not surprisingly, the more healthy habits people had, the longer their lifespan.” All of these results were statistically significant. There is a link to the actual study at the bottom of the post, it’s very clearly written, take a look.
Protein is all the rage, and here’s why: It helps keep you fuller for longer, helping to fight the urge to snack all day long and also providing fuel for your workouts. You’ll find YQ by Yoplait plain yogurt made with ultra-filtered milk, offering 17 grams of protein per 5.3-ounce single-serve container; collagen-based coffee creamer from Vital Proteins; and ready-to-drink soups with collagen protein from Zupa Noma.
Replace "I should" with "I choose." So instead of "I should be eating more fruits and vegetables," it's "I choose to eat more fruits and vegetables" or "I choose not to," because it's more powerful language," Williams says. "It shows that you're in control, you're making the choice. So if you choose to or you choose not to, you make the choice and you move on."
All humans have to eat food for growth and maintenance of a healthy body, but we humans have different requirements as infants, children (kids), teenagers, young adults, adults, and seniors. For example, infants may require feeding every four hours until they gradually age and begin to take in more solid foods. Eventually they develop into the more normal pattern of eating three times per day as young kids. However, as most parents know, kids, teenagers, and young adults often snack between meals. Snacking is often not limited to these age groups because adults and seniors often do the same.
HDL (high-density lipoprotein), or the "good" cholesterol, and LDL (low-density lipoprotein), or the "bad" cholesterol, are lipoproteins that carry cholesterol through the veins and arteries of the body. HDL and LDL combined, is your "total" blood cholesterol. The difference between the two are that high levels of the "good," or HDL cholesterol, may protect against narrowing of the blood vessels in the body, which protects you against heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases. But high levels of LDL, or the "bad" cholesterol, may worsen the narrowing of the blood vessels in the body, which puts you at a greater risk of stroke, heart attack, and cardiovascular diseases, some of which are life threatening.
Being the healthiest you can possibly be means eating a variety of healthy foods, being physically active and understanding the nutrients you need to protect your bones, immune system, physical and mental health.  A healthy eating plan, knowing which diets work, how active you should be for your age and what you can do to manage your weight are important too. What about getting a good night's sleep, knowing how much alcohol puts you in the risky category and the benefits of stopping smoking even after 24 hours? All these things contribute to a healthier life and we have topped it off with recipes from Jean Hailes naturopath Sandra Villella.
Look for oat milk from Oatly, walnut and hazelnut milks from Elmhurst 1925, pecan milk from MALK, flax milk from Manitoba Milling Co., and banana milk from Mooala. Wondering why your alternative milk’s label says “milked nuts” or “malk”? It’s because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the process of likely banning all nondairy milks from using “milk” in their names.
A healthy lifestyle is a valuable resource for reducing the incidence and impact of health problems, for recovery, for coping with life stressors, and for improving quality of life. There is a growing body of scientific evidence that shows our lifestyles play a huge part in how healthy we are. From what we eat and drink, to how much exercise we take, and whether we smoke or take drugs, all will affect our health, not only in terms of life expectancy, but how long we can expect to live without experiencing chronic disease.
The most important aspect here is the mentality you bring to your exercise. Ideally, it’s not a chore but an enjoyable occasion. If that means you invite a friend to make it a social occasion too, then by all means do whatever it takes to get you outside, inhaling fresh air and experiencing the endorphins that our body releases when we are active. The feeling of satisfaction after completing a work out of some variety is hard to beat. It’s also addictive.
Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn't have to mean drastic changes. Making small changes in how you live may seem like a slow process, and it is. You may adapt to change better when it doesn't require you to overhaul your entire life. Just pick one thing and work on that one thing every day, letting the rest of your life and habits stay the same. You may be surprised that those small changes really can make a difference.
Be wary of the lattes at your local coffee shop, as they're often loaded with extra sugar and empty calories. Pure coffee beans contain powerful health-boosting antioxidants. Don't erase these benefits with a waistline expanding helping of whole milk and added sugar. Opt for regular coffee and add a splash of your own cream and zero-calorie sweetener—or try to drink it black.
Repeated dieting can actually lower metabolism and thus make your body retain more of what you put into it. Increasing exercise while not giving your body more food to compensate can also increase body fat storage. Dieting also increases heart disease risk, when compared to simply gaining a little weight. If you really need to lose weight, the most effective way is to increase exercise and cutting only a little food, while concentrating on fruits, veggies, and high fiber foods.
Why is there such a sudden frenzy over the purple berry? YouTube is rich with DIY videos for making a cold and flu-fighting elderberry syrup. But LaMonte cautions that you really need to know what you’re doing before you make elderberries part of your diet since raw elderberries, as well as the leaves and flowers, contain a chemical that produces cyanide, which can cause nausea, vomiting and even more serious issues at high doses. If you're just getting acquainted with the fruit, it's best to start with a store-bought version of the syrup — just look for one that doesn't contain too many additives and excess sugar.
In a small Finnish study of 72 middle-aged people, eating just under a cup of mixed berries—including strawberries, red raspberries, bilberries (similar to blueberries), lingonberries and other native kinds—each day for eight weeks was associated with higher levels of "good" HDL cholesterol and lower blood pressure. The diverse mix provided a wide range of polyphenols, plant compounds that may increase levels of nitric oxide, which in turn helps relax blood vessels and lower blood pressure.
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