Non-dairy milks (or mylks), like almond and coconut, have been big over the past five years, but oat milk is set to outpace them by 2019. It’s allergen free (unless you're allergic to oats) and baristas love it because it foams up nicely for lattes. Oatly, a brand from Sweden, has increased production of its oat milk by 1,250 percent since 2017 after it was first introduced to cafes in the U.S.
Hi Tom, Yes, as reported: “Study investigators also calculated life expectancy by how many of these five healthy habits people had. Just one healthy habit (and it didn’t matter which one) … just one… extended life expectancy by two years in men and women. Not surprisingly, the more healthy habits people had, the longer their lifespan.” All of these results were statistically significant. There is a link to the actual study at the bottom of the post, it’s very clearly written, take a look.
Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conducted a massive study of the impact of health habits on life expectancy, using data from the well-known Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). This means that they had data on a huge number of people over a very long period of time. The NHS included over 78,000 women and followed them from 1980 to 2014. The HPFS included over 40,000 men and followed them from 1986 to 2014. This is over 120,000 participants, 34 years of data for women, and 28 years of data for men.
Chocolate has gotten a lot of buzz in recent years as a heart-healthy treat. Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, plant nutrients that help repair cell damage. Flavanols—cocoa's main kind of flavonoid—help lower blood pressure, promote proper blood clotting and boost blood flow to the brain and heart. Add to that a hefty helping of minerals, fiber and other powerful antioxidants, and you have one sweet package. And the heart benefits are impressive: In one study of nearly 5,000 people, nibbling on chocolate five or more times a week was associated with a whopping 57 percent lower risk of heart disease, compared to non-chocolate eaters. (Keep in mind, though, that this was an observational study, so the research didn't prove a cause and effect.)
Emotional stress plays an important role in many illnesses, both directly and indirectly. People are also more likely to smoke, overeat, drink too much, work too hard, argue with others and so on, when they are feeling stressed. Thus, stress management is an important part of your new lifestyle, and meditation and relaxation techniques are truly a key part of living a healthy lifestyle.

Studies show the ruby-red fruit may help reduce the buildup of plaque in arteries and lower blood pressure. Experts believe that pomegranate's benefits come from its powerful punch of polyphenols, including anthocyanins (found in blue, purple and deep-red foods) and tannins (also found in wine and tea). In a 2010 study ranking the antioxidant capacity of 3,100 foods from all over the world, pomegranate juice had the highest antioxidants of any fruit juice.
Emotional stress plays an important role in many illnesses, both directly and indirectly. People are also more likely to smoke, overeat, drink too much, work too hard, argue with others and so on, when they are feeling stressed. Thus, stress management is an important part of your new lifestyle, and meditation and relaxation techniques are truly a key part of living a healthy lifestyle.
Consumers have shown a growing interest in digestive health, and sales of products in this category are projected to grow at an annual rate of 10.4 percent through 2023, according to a report by research firm Markets and Markets. Of course, probiotic-containing foods will still be big in 2019 but prebiotics are already showing up in cereals, like the Kellogg’s-backed Happy Inside. We’ll likely be seeing more drinks, bars and other ready-to-eat snack items touting a prebiotic punch in 2019.
Overall, it is best to eat a diet made up of a lot of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein such as chicken or fish. It is difficult to lead an active lifestyle without eating a healthy diet, because it will be difficult to get enough energy to exercise. Get creative while cooking, and try to make new recipes with healthy ingredients; it is always possible to find new favorite foods. Again, be sure to drink enough water every day, and to try to quit unhealthy habits such as smoking or excessive drinking.
Cut down on processed food. Processed foods are not good because (1) most nutritional value is lost in the making of these foods and (2) the added preservatives are bad for our health. Many processed foods contain a high amount of salt content, which leads to higher blood pressure and heart disease. Processed foods are anything that is not in its raw form. In general, most food in supermarkets are processed — the more ingredients it has on the label (especially the ones ending with ‘ite’ or ‘ate’), the more processed they are. Watch out for those with salt/sugar in the first 5 ingredients and go for unprocessed food as much as possible.
Green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, kale, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, bok choy, asparagus and watercress) are a great start to any meal. The wider variety of colours you have on your plate, the more likely you are to ingest a wider range of nutrients. Steaming or frying these in coconut oil will ensure the produce maintains much of its nutrients. Having these in your diet five days a week should be the minimum to keep you ticking along.
Tobacco use causes or contributes to a large number of cancers in the U.S. In men, 90% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking; 80% in women. Tobacco use causes cancers of the lung, mouth, lip, tongue, esophagus,kidney, and bladder. It also further increases the risk of bladder cancer in subjects occupationally exposed to certain organic chemicals found in the textile, leather, rubber, dye, paint, and other organic chemical industries, and further increases the risk of lung cancer among subjects exposed to asbestos.
Remember how important cycles can be. The less sleep you get, the more likely you are to sleep late in the morning. The less time you have to prepare your breakfast and lunch may lead to you grabbing cheap and unhealthy options. This can cause you to feel low on energy and tired, which can contribute to another poor decision when it comes to your nutrition later in the day.

Routine is crucial. Building a pattern of behavior up over a long period of time will make it easier for you to sustain your healthy lifestyle. Remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day. So, if you do step outside your plan, you can get back on track just as quickly. Continue to prioritise what is important to you in your life and it should allow you to navigate your way through any challenging twists and turns in the road.
Green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, kale, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, bok choy, asparagus and watercress) are a great start to any meal. The wider variety of colours you have on your plate, the more likely you are to ingest a wider range of nutrients. Steaming or frying these in coconut oil will ensure the produce maintains much of its nutrients. Having these in your diet five days a week should be the minimum to keep you ticking along.
Sipping an afternoon cup of green tea may be an easy way to help your heart. That's because green tea has catechins, powerful antioxidants that, over time, can significantly reduce levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Drinking a lot of green tea could even add years to your life. An 11-year study that followed 40,530 Japanese adults found that those who drank five cups of green tea a day had a 26 percent lower risk of heart disease and a 16 percent lower risk of death from all causes, compared to those who drank less than one cup a day.
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