One of the more difficult situations to handle is the morning tea treat that may well present itself in an office environment courtesy of someone’s birthday, a reward or thank you to your team or a team meeting that requires a snack. These snacks usually include cakes and savories filled with sugar or carbohydrates. Do you have a plan for avoiding these? Do you like to keep quiet about your healthy food choices, or do you prefer to let your team know about the lifestyle changes you’re making? An alternative morning tea snack is a handful of almonds or a piece of fruit.
Eating a healthy diet is another part of the healthy lifestyle. Not only can a clean diet help with weight management, it can also improve your health and quality of life as you get older. You already know about the food groups and the fact that you should eat more fruits and vegetables and less processed foods. You probably have a list of things you know you should do for a healthier diet but, again, making too many changes at once can backfire. Going on a restrictive diet may make you crave the very foods you're trying to avoid.​
The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
When it comes to healthy eating, there is an overwhelming array of theories, diet books and online information about what to eat – which is often conflicting. Although the research is still ongoing and developing, what the experts all agree on is that our diets are too high in sugar, our portions are too big and we should eat a variety of whole natural foods.
“I think we’re finally moving away from [only] calories and numbers,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, who is in private practice in New York City and Los Angeles. “My clients want to know more about the functional benefits of foods, including how they impact digestive health, immunity, sleep, energy, and mental focus. More consumers are now connecting food choices with everyday quality-of-life outcomes, and labels that offer more information can help make that easier.”
Yes. Just allot yourself enough time to get a good night's sleep. Stick to a regular sleep schedule as best as you can, rather than sleeping and waking up at different times from day to day. Do not exercise within 2 hours of sleeping. Do not eat large amounts of food before going to sleep. Avoid caffeine or sugary foods and drinks before sleeping. Try not to use your TV, computer, phone, tablet or any other screen shortly before sleeping. Dim your lights before you go to sleep. All of this, combined with living a healthier lifestyle all around should greatly increase your quality of sleep.
Triglycerides are found in body fat and from the fats you eat. Triglycerides levels in the blood reflect what you have eaten recently. HDL and LDL cholesterol levels show what you have been eating over a long period of time. If you eat a fatty meal your triglyceride levels will be elevated for a short period of time. If you continue to eat a diet high in fat your triglyceride levels will continue to rise. The liver transfers the triglycerides into body fat, or cholesterol, which raises LDL and lowers HDL levels in the blood.
Eating healthy doesn't mean that you need to deprive yourself of delicious flavors and foods. (See: Please Stop Feeling Guilty About What You Eat) Try one of these healthy desserts for a snack that satisfies your sweet tooth or—if you're really dying for that ice cream or pizza—go ahead and indulge in something "unhealthy." (Just don't make it an all-the-time thing.) Life is all about balance, right?
Using a foam roller to perform self-myofascial release (a fancy way of saying "to massage the connective tissue surrounding your muscles, bones, and tendons") is one of the least expensive yet most effective ways to recover from your workout. By using your own body weight to roll on the foam, you can improve flexibility, function, and performance and reduce injuries. Plus, it feels amazing! (Here's a full guide on how to use a foam roller.)
Alcoholism is a disease that includes alcohol craving and continued drinking despite repeated alcohol-related problems, such as losing a job or getting into trouble with the law. It can cause myriad health problems, including cirrhosis of the liver, birth defects, heart disease, stroke, psychological problems, and dementia. Counseling and a few medications can be effective for alcoholism treatment.
Mountains of research studies show that the more fruits and veggies you eat, the lower your risk of heart disease. A 2014 meta-analysis of studies following nearly 470,000 people found that each additional daily serving of fruits and vegetables cut the risk of death by heart disease by an average of 4 percent. The superstars that contributed the most benefits? Leafy green vegetables. Low in calories but high in fiber, leafy greens like spinach, lettuce, kale and cabbage deliver vitamins and minerals essential for heart health. They're especially high in vitamin K, important for proper blood clotting. One surprising recent study in teens suggests that a lack of vitamin K may affect the actual heart structure, leading to a higher risk of heart disease later in life.
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