Why is there such a sudden frenzy over the purple berry? YouTube is rich with DIY videos for making a cold and flu-fighting elderberry syrup. But LaMonte cautions that you really need to know what you’re doing before you make elderberries part of your diet since raw elderberries, as well as the leaves and flowers, contain a chemical that produces cyanide, which can cause nausea, vomiting and even more serious issues at high doses. If you're just getting acquainted with the fruit, it's best to start with a store-bought version of the syrup — just look for one that doesn't contain too many additives and excess sugar.
Since launching in 2013, Soom’s sales have exploded by 1,300 percent. Tahini is rich in minerals like magnesium and potassium and it's high in protein and unsaturated fat. For cooks, tahini offers a wonderfully creamy texture and can be used to enhance a variety of foods. Expect to see tahini showing up in everything from salad dressing to vegan caramel sauce in the year ahead.
“Do good” is a mantra many companies, small and big alike, are standing by these days. General Mills, for instance, set a goal to sustainably source 10 of its top ingredients by the year 2020. It’s currently meeting 76 percent of that goal, with all of its palm oil, 99 percent of its fiber packaging, 81 percent of its U.S. sugar beets, and 67 percent of its U.S. dry milled corn sustainably sourced. This notably impacts its Cheerios and Nature Valley lines.
Pay attention to the language you use when thinking or talking to others. If you’re focused on staying off something completely ‘forever’, then the moment you break your word, the floodgates will open. Try to identify what could have caused you to make that decision (lack of sleep, stress etc), learn from it and be better next time. This is all great learning for you as you add to your toolbox to deal with the challenges of a busy schedule.
Why is there such a sudden frenzy over the purple berry? YouTube is rich with DIY videos for making a cold and flu-fighting elderberry syrup. But LaMonte cautions that you really need to know what you’re doing before you make elderberries part of your diet since raw elderberries, as well as the leaves and flowers, contain a chemical that produces cyanide, which can cause nausea, vomiting and even more serious issues at high doses. If you're just getting acquainted with the fruit, it's best to start with a store-bought version of the syrup — just look for one that doesn't contain too many additives and excess sugar.
A healthy active lifestyle is considered to be a lifestyle that includes a healthy diet and a regular exercise plan. It generally also includes an absence of unhealthy habits, such as smoking. A healthy and active lifestyle is a lifestyle that many people of all ages strive for, and with a little effort, it is entirely possible to achieve through some simple life changes.
Just for today, replace some of the carbohydrates (rice, pasta, cereal, breads) in your diet with protein (meat, beans, egg, fish, etc.) at each meal. Researchers at the University of Illinois put people on either a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet or a moderate-protein diet. At the end of four months, all study participants lost the same amount of weight, but those who ate more protein lost 22 percent more fat and gained more muscle, leaving them looking fit and trim. The high-carbohydrate group was left "skinny fat."
Chocolate has gotten a lot of buzz in recent years as a heart-healthy treat. Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, plant nutrients that help repair cell damage. Flavanols—cocoa's main kind of flavonoid—help lower blood pressure, promote proper blood clotting and boost blood flow to the brain and heart. Add to that a hefty helping of minerals, fiber and other powerful antioxidants, and you have one sweet package. And the heart benefits are impressive: In one study of nearly 5,000 people, nibbling on chocolate five or more times a week was associated with a whopping 57 percent lower risk of heart disease, compared to non-chocolate eaters. (Keep in mind, though, that this was an observational study, so the research didn't prove a cause and effect.)
At one of your meals today, double the amount of vegetables on your plate and skip the starch. A simple way to do it: Serve stir-fry over a bed of broccoli instead of rice. (Or turn the broccoli into rice!) The florets of the broccoli will soak up the sauce and juices from your dish just like the rice would have. Plus, you have the added cancer-fighting addition of indole 3-carbinol, a potent anti-cancer nutrient found in vegetables like broccoli and cabbage. (Also try making vegetable steaks instead of meat.)

Nuts are full of vitamins, minerals and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, and have low levels of saturated fats. Research suggests that people who eat nuts—walnuts, pecans, almonds, hazelnuts, pistachios, pine nuts and peanuts (which actually are legumes)—two to four days or more a week have a lower incidence of heart disease than people who eat them less often. Does it matter what kind? Some researchers say walnuts win the honors. A study from the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania found that walnuts have more high-quality antioxidants than any other variety. And it only takes a small handful—just seven walnuts a day—to get the heart benefits.
×