We all know whole grains are good for us, but we’ve collected the best whole-grain recipes to make them a regular part of your cooking routine. The fiber and nutrients associated with whole grains make them an essential part of a healthy diet, but it’s often difficult to work them into your everyday cooking. This collection of recipes uses whole grains—from brown rice to whole-wheat pasta—in a delicious variety of ways.
The good news is, you don't have to change everything at the same time. In fact, the trick to healthy living is making small changes—taking more steps each day, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water, or saying no to that second helping of buttery mashed potatoes. One thing you can do right now to make your lifestyle healthier is to move more.
Trying to decide what you're going to eat in the morning while you're rushing to get out the door is a recipe for diet disaster. Take 10 minutes tonight to plan out all your breakfasts for the week. Having a weekly nutrition plan will increase your likelihood of following through and eating breakfast every morning. (The 30-Day Meal Prep Challenge covers all the basics.)

Yes. Just allot yourself enough time to get a good night's sleep. Stick to a regular sleep schedule as best as you can, rather than sleeping and waking up at different times from day to day. Do not exercise within 2 hours of sleeping. Do not eat large amounts of food before going to sleep. Avoid caffeine or sugary foods and drinks before sleeping. Try not to use your TV, computer, phone, tablet or any other screen shortly before sleeping. Dim your lights before you go to sleep. All of this, combined with living a healthier lifestyle all around should greatly increase your quality of sleep.

Eating apples was associated with a lower risk of death from both coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease in the Iowa Women's Health Study, which has been tracking more than 34,000 women for nearly 20 years. And Finnish researchers studying dietary data collected over nearly 30 years from 9,208 men and women also found that frequent apple eaters had the lowest risk of strokes compared with non-apple eaters. What explains the heart-healthy benefits? Researchers say it's the strong antioxidant flavonoid compounds found in apples. These compounds play a key role by stopping inflammation and preventing the buildup of plaque in arteries. Apples are also rich in pectin, a form of soluble fiber known to help lower cholesterol, and they provide a decent amount of vitamin C, another antioxidant.
Low FODMAPFor sufferers of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) a low FODMAP diet can significantly improve symptoms. Healthy Food Guide has a collection of FODMAP-friendly recipes so you can look after your IBS without struggling to find things you can eat. For more low FODMAP recipe ideas see our recipe filter for recipes that can easily be made into a low FODMAP options.
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