Eating healthy doesn't mean that you need to deprive yourself of delicious flavors and foods. (See: Please Stop Feeling Guilty About What You Eat) Try one of these healthy desserts for a snack that satisfies your sweet tooth or—if you're really dying for that ice cream or pizza—go ahead and indulge in something "unhealthy." (Just don't make it an all-the-time thing.) Life is all about balance, right?

The outcome of a healthy lifestyle can be seen in your energy levels, complexion, brightness of the eyes, shiny hair or just a general glow that surrounds you, like an aura. Once you see or feel these positive changes or receive the feedback that you’re looking great, this should encourage you to continue along your pathway to a better version of yourself.
The feeling of sharing a meaningful conversation or experience with someone you trust and respect is special. These relationships need time and care, so make time to maintain them. Life is full of unforeseen twists and turns and you never know what life event may mean you don’t have immediate access to them in person. If distance is an issue, thankfully we now have various social media apps that allow video calling.
Unsaturated fats are an important part of a healthy diet. The two main types of unsaturated fats are monounsaturated fats (found in olive and canola oil, avocados, cashews and almonds) and polyunsaturated fats like omega-3 fats (found in oily fish) and omega-6 fats (found in safflower and soybean oil and Brazil nuts). These fats can help reduce the risk of heart disease and lower cholesterol levels when they replace saturated fats in the diet. The Australian Dietary Guidelines include a small allowance for healthy fats each day (around 1–2 tablespoons for adults and less for children). The best way to include healthy fats in your diet is to replace saturated fat that you may currently be eating (such as butter and cream) with a healthier, unsaturated fat option (such as polyunsaturated margarine or olive oil). 
Every diet begins with watching what you eat. Counting calories is key whether you're maintaining a healthy weight or working to shed a few pounds. Fortunately, there's an easier way to go about the math than tracking down nutritional info and logging every bite: build a strong portfolio of delicious low-calorie meals and let it do the work for you. We'll get you started with this collection of 400-calorie dinner recipes that are short on calories but big on flavor. The only arithmetic you'll be responsible for is subtracting pounds.

Learn how to breathe. Believe it or not, most of us have never been taught how to breathe properly. Diaphragmatic breathing is a hidden gem that needs to be shared with more of the population because the benefits are life-changing. Breathing at one-third capacity, which is how most of us breathe, can cause tension and exhaustion and even encourage aches and illness. Breathing with your diaphragm ensures your lungs are filled to their capacity and allows your muscles (including the brain) to be in a more relaxed state, aiding stronger decision making and enhanced performance. Here’s a handy video to show you how it’s done:
Skip smoothies sold at your local smoothie bar or fast-food joint, as they're usually packed with tons of sugar. Instead, toss these ingredients in the blender for a healthy meal on the go: 1 scoop of your favorite protein powder; 1 small handful of walnuts; 1 cup of spinach or kale; 1 to 1 1/2 cups of blueberries, strawberries, peaches, or bananas; a couple ice cubes; and 2 cups of water. Blend until the ice is completely crushed. (We also have way more healthy smoothie recipes that are perfect for breakfast.)
It doesn't matter how many hours you spend at the gym each week: if you don't clean up your diet, you will not see the results you want! A study from the University of Texas found that without dietary control, people who completed a 12-week program of resistance training and high-intensity interval training lost a disappointing 1 percent of body fat. Don't let your hard work go to waste! (That's exactly why Harley Pasternak says working out is the least important part of losing weight.)

Vegetables and legumes – raw or cooked vegetables can be used as a snack food or as a part of lunch and dinner. Salad vegetables can be used as a sandwich filling. Vegetable soup can make a healthy lunch. Stir-fries, vegetable patties and vegetable curries make nutritious evening meals. Try raw vegetables like carrot and celery sticks for a snack ‘on the run’.

A 2018 analysis found a surprising link between yogurt and heart health in people with high blood pressure. In the study, researchers looked at data collected over 30 years from more than 55,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study, and more than 18,000 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. They found that those who ate two or more servings of yogurt a week had a roughly 20 percent lower risk of heart attack or stroke compared to those who ate less. Adding yogurt to an already healthy diet upped the benefits even more.
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