Set a regular sleep schedule. When Shives treats insomnia patients, she tells them that although they can't make themselves fall asleep, they can make themselves get up at a certain time the next morning. And though they may be tired at first, if they don't nap, they may start sleeping better during the following nights. "We're going to get nowhere if they take big naps during the day and keep a very erratic sleep schedule; it's chaos then," Shives says.
Do you habitually eat lunch at your desk or in front of the TV? A 2011 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who multitask while eating lunch (study participants played solitaire) felt less full and ate more food 30 minutes later than those who were not distracted during lunch. Next time you sit down to eat, do just that—and nothing else. Taking 10 minutes to focus on and enjoy the food you're eating will leave you more satisfied and more in control of your appetite. (It's called mindful eating, and here's how you do it.)
Eat a high calorie breakfast! This will decrease your hunger for the rest of the day as well as speed up your metabolism. Make sure you drink a lot of water, and drink a glass before eating, since you will become full faster. Using smaller plates has a psychological effect which decreases the amount of food you eat. Also, try to limit the amount of sugar and empty calories you take in and eat more lean protein which will keep you full longer and less hungry.

The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
Take on challenges like races or events or hikes: once upon a time, walking to the shop seemed like a marathon, now you might be considering taking on that 5/10/20 km fun run. The beautiful mountains in the distance that have always captured your eye are now no longer just there for show. You begin to think how long it might take you to hike to the top.
Eating a varied, well-balanced diet means eating a variety of foods from each food groups daily, in the recommended amounts. It is also important to choose a variety of foods from within each food group because different foods provide different types and amounts of key nutrients. Choosing a variety of foods will help to make your meals interesting, so that you don’t get bored with your diet. 
Skip smoothies sold at your local smoothie bar or fast-food joint, as they're usually packed with tons of sugar. Instead, toss these ingredients in the blender for a healthy meal on the go: 1 scoop of your favorite protein powder; 1 small handful of walnuts; 1 cup of spinach or kale; 1 to 1 1/2 cups of blueberries, strawberries, peaches, or bananas; a couple ice cubes; and 2 cups of water. Blend until the ice is completely crushed. (We also have way more healthy smoothie recipes that are perfect for breakfast.)

The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
Physical activity is important for people of all weight ranges and health conditions. It helps us burn off the extra calories, it is good for the heart and circulatory system, it maintains or increases our muscle mass, it helps us focus, and improves overall health well-being. We don't have to be top athletes to get on the move! 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity is advised, and it can easily become part of our daily routine. We all could:
Be wary of the lattes at your local coffee shop, as they're often loaded with extra sugar and empty calories. Pure coffee beans contain powerful health-boosting antioxidants. Don't erase these benefits with a waistline expanding helping of whole milk and added sugar. Opt for regular coffee and add a splash of your own cream and zero-calorie sweetener—or try to drink it black.
Conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, joint disease, and mental illness are responsible for a vast number of deaths and disabilities. Currently, we rely almost exclusively on the provision of clinical care by highly trained health professionals as our major strategy to deal with these conditions. Many health problems can be prevented or at least their occurrence postponed by having a healthy lifestyle.
Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a day -- and no fair skipping the items you're embarrassed about. "The idea is to write it down ... without judgment," says Kathianne Sellers Williams, MEd, RD, LD, a nutritionist, wellness coach, and personal trainer with Cafe Physique in Atlanta. "You can't change what you're not aware of or don't acknowledge."
More reason to love your morning cuppa joe: Growing evidence suggests that drinking coffee helps protect the heart, particularly for women. In fact, the more you drink—up to five cups a day—the greater the benefits, some research shows. One study recently published in the journal Circulation reviewed data from the decades-long Framingham Heart Study, which looks at diet and heart health. The researchers found that, compared with non-coffee drinkers, people who drank coffee had a 7 percent lower risk of heart failure and an 8 percent lower risk of stroke. While the study couldn't prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, it does show a strong link.
“Clearly, the greatest cancer risks are concentrated in the heavy and moderate drinker categories. Nevertheless, some cancer risk persists even at low levels of consumption. A meta-analysis that focused solely on cancer risks associated with drinking one drink or fewer per day observed that this level of alcohol consumption was still associated with some elevated risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, oropharyngeal cancer, and breast cancer, but no discernable associations were seen for cancers of the colorectum, larynx, and liver. On the basis of the lesser overall cancer risk at the lower end of the dose-response continuum, the World Cancer Research Fund/AICR made the following recommendation: ‘If alcoholic drinks are consumed, limit consumption to two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women.'” You can check out the entire article here: http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1155
Learn how to breathe. Believe it or not, most of us have never been taught how to breathe properly. Diaphragmatic breathing is a hidden gem that needs to be shared with more of the population because the benefits are life-changing. Breathing at one-third capacity, which is how most of us breathe, can cause tension and exhaustion and even encourage aches and illness. Breathing with your diaphragm ensures your lungs are filled to their capacity and allows your muscles (including the brain) to be in a more relaxed state, aiding stronger decision making and enhanced performance. Here’s a handy video to show you how it’s done:
Variety is key to ensuring you don’t get bored, so change it up as much as you can. If your chosen exercise is walking, then change your route, search Google Maps to find new unchartered parks or mountain walks to keep you entertained. And, change your company so that you’re seeing as many friends as possible. I can’t think of a better way to catch up on the comings and goings of your friends’ lives than sweating it out together in open air.
Low FODMAPFor sufferers of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) a low FODMAP diet can significantly improve symptoms. Healthy Food Guide has a collection of FODMAP-friendly recipes so you can look after your IBS without struggling to find things you can eat. For more low FODMAP recipe ideas see our recipe filter for recipes that can easily be made into a low FODMAP options.
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